Fun Cat Sailing Tours

Welcome to Fun Cat Sailing Tours the Catamaran if filled with fun, style and great experiences! Located in San Diego, California, the boat offers a variety of tours from Bachelorette Party fun to Whale Watching and Kayak Tours and they provide snacks and drinks on board as well. What makes the tours truly spectacular is the array of marine wild life seen on the beautiful seas as well as being on the water while the sun sets. From Sea Lions, Dolphins and Whales, this makes for a great view and an absolutely fun filled time. Owner of Fun Cat Sailing Tours is Captain Rod Jones, who has been in the sailing business for more than twenty five years. He owns two catamarans namely “Tigress” and “Wind Drum” and provides very friendly service. Give them a visit for a sailing adventure today.

Contender_sailing_dinghyWhat to Look Out For on Your Sailing Adventure

While sailing with Fun Cat, depending on the time of year, you will have the opportunity to view several different types of sea life. Fun Cat has the expertise and equipment to ensure you can get right up close to all of the marine life along the way. Some of the exciting sea life you might see on your Fun Cat cruise are:

  • Dolphins- The most commonly sighted dolphins are the common dolphin, bottlenose dolphin and Risso’s dolphin.
  • Common Dolphin- There is two types of Common Dolphin, both of which are medium-sized with adult dolphins ranging between six point two and eight point two feet. They can weigh between 80–235 kg (176–518 lb), although the range between 80–150 kg (180–330 lb) is more common. The male dolphins of this species are generally longer and heavier. The color pattern on their body is unusual. The back is dark and the belly is white, while on each side is an hourglass pattern colored light grey, yellow, or gold in front and dirty grey in back. They have long, thin rostra with up to 50–60 small, sharp, interlocking teeth on each side of each jaw.
  • Bottlenose Dolphin- There is also two types of Bottle nosed dolphin; the common bottlenose dolphin and the Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin. They typically live in groups of ten to thirty members called pods. The common bottlenose dolphin is found in most tropical to temperate oceans, and it has a grey color, with the shade of grey varying among populations, but it can be bluish-grey, brownish-grey, or even nearly black, and is often darker on the back from the rostrum to behind the dorsal fin.
  • Risso’s Dolphin- Risso’s dolphin has a relatively large front body and dorsal fin, while the latter tapers to a relatively narrow tail. The bulbous head has a vertical crease in front. Their infants are dorsally grey to brown and ventrally cream-colored, with a white anchor-shaped area between the pectorals and around the mouth. In older calves, the nonwhite areas darken to nearly black, and then lighten (except for the always dark dorsal fin). Older individuals appear mostly white.
  • Whales- The most commonly sighted whales are Fin Whales, Humpback whales and Gray Whales.
  • Fin Whales- The fin whales also called finback whale or razor back is the second largest species of whale after the blue whale. The fin whale’s body is long and slender and is colored brownish-grey with a paler underside. The fin whale is a large baleen whale that belongs to the cetacean order, which is composed of all species of whale, dolphin and porpoise.
  • Humpback Whales- Humpbacks can be identified by their stocky body, obvious hump, black dorsal coloring and elongated pectoral fins. The head and lower jaw are covered with knobs called tubercles, which are hair follicles and are characteristic of the species. Their tails are fluked and typically rise above the surface when diving. It also has wavy trailing edges.
  • Gray Whales- The gray whale is also known as the grey whale, gray back whale, Pacific gray whale, or California gray whale. They grew up to forty nine feet in length. The gray whale has a dark slate-grey colour and is covered by characteristic gray-white patterns, scars left by parasites which drop off in its cold feeding grounds. Individual whales are typically identified using photographs of their dorsal surface and matching the scars and patches associated with parasites that have fallen off the whale or are still attached. They have two blowholes on top of their head, which can create a distinctive V-shaped blow at the surface in calm wind conditions.
  • Californian Sea Lion -The Californian Sea Lion is one out of five in the sea lion species. It is sexually dimorphic, with the males being larger than females, and having a thicker neck and protruding crest. Differ in size, shape, and coloration between the sexes. Males are typically around seven point nine feet (7.9) long and weigh up to seven hundred and seventy pounds, while females are typically around five point nine feet (5.9) and weigh up to two hundred and twenty pounds. Females and juveniles have a tawny brown coat, although they may be temporarily light gray or silver after moulting. The coat of adult males can be anywhere from light brown to black, but is typically dark brown. The face of adult males may also be light tan in some areas. Pups have a black or dark brown pelage at birth. Although the species has a slender build, adult males have robust necks, chests, and shoulders. Adult males also have a protruding crest which gives them a “high, domed forehead”;[t is tufted with white hairs. They also have manes, which are less developed than those of adult male South American and Steller sea lions .Both sexes have long, narrow muzzles.
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